Tips on Mold Pricing

Got Mold? Tips on Mold Remediation and Pricing

Home and business owners often do their best to prepare for the inherent dangers that come along with being a property owner. Dangers like home or office security, fire damage, severe storms, and water damage are on the short list of what keeps a property owner up at night. While these hazards can prove to be extremely costly and dangerous, a silent threat that is often forgotten about can be just as detrimental to the wallet and to the health of a property’s inhabitants. This silent threat is simply known as mold.

Mold growth is actually a necessary part of the everyday environment as spores can often be found both indoors and outdoors. However, when toxic mold spore counts are elevated inside the home or business, indoor air quality can negatively affect the health of families, colleagues and customers respectively. Also, the physical toll mold growth takes on the structural integrity of a property can be catastrophic.

Needless to say, removal of the toxic fungus must be done immediately in a safe, effective way. Property owners often do not take mold remediation into account when budgeting for repairs. Oftentimes, home and business owners look for the least expensive option when shopping for a remediation specialist.

Value of mold remediation depends on a variety of factors. First, it is important to understand how mold behaves and how the colony can spread throughout the home or business. Whenever mold is attacked, it sends its spores into the air to find a suitable replacement area to regrow the colony. Therefore, if a general contractor without the proper equipment or insurance simply cuts away areas affected by mold without treating it properly, cross contamination will occur as spores populate other areas of the property.

Mold spores can regenerate a colony whether they are dead or alive. Valuable residential and commercial mold remediation pricing includes:

• Containment of the affected area

• Removal and safe disposal of mold affected materials (eg. drywall, carpet, padding, wood, etc.)

• Scrubbing of support beams and concrete with brushes and EPA-approved biowashes

• Eradication and removal of live and dead spores with a HEPA filter vacuum

Along with these general practices, which provide a level of safety and efficiency necessary to mitigate mold, technicians should also wear Personal Protective Equipment, maintain proper insurance and bonding, and complete training and certification. These practices will ensure the safety and health of the technicians and the property inhabitants who are counting on dependable mold removal.

Cheap mold restoration does not provide true value. While initial costs may be less by choosing an uninsured, uncertified contractor who does not follow the mold removal guidelines listed above, costs will increase exponentially in the long run when spores contaminate other areas of the home or business.

Source: SI Restoration

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2013. All rights reserved.

Millennials Take New Approach to Work-Life Balance

Millennials Take New Approach to Work-Life Balance

(BPT)—More and more, Millennials are on the road for work. In an average month, one in four business-traveling Millennials travel overnight for work at least once per week.

As the line between “personal” and “business” grows thinner and thinner for this generation, Millennials are increasingly finding adventure through business. More than any other group, Millennial business travelers are more likely to add on extra days to their business trip for leisure travel (84 percent) according to the Hilton Garden Inn Discovery and Connection Survey. Millennials are funding these adventures through their business trips, too. The vast majority of this group (85 percent) is more likely to use reward points from their business travel to book a vacation, compared to a year ago.

As the economy improves, business travel across the nation is on the rise. According to the Global Business Travel Association, U.S. business travel is expected to grow 5.1 percent in 2013. As more Millennials hit the road for work, they are keeping top of mind a few, simple business travel perks to fulfill their appetite for personal adventure and discovery:

* Fly for free – Those flying for business can earn airline miles in their name. These business miles quickly add up, allowing travelers to upgrade seats or add another destination without accruing additional cost. Business travelers can then use these miles to bring a friend or loved one on the trip with them – quickly transitioning from business to family vacation or romantic getaway once the weekend hits.

* Earn hotel perks – Frequent stays in hotels offering rewards programs can grant business travelers benefits like free overnight stays, late checkout, and complimentary breakfast. These extras turn a business trip into much more, especially when additional nights are used to extend a business trip into a vacation.

* Discover local hidden gems – Cities often encourage business travelers to experience the local culture while in town and provide package deals with discounts to restaurants, tickets to local shows or events, helpful tips to find transportation in the city and even sightseeing opportunities to explore during free time. This becomes even more common when a city is hosting a large business gathering, such as an industry convention.

Millennials continue to be at the forefront of achieving work-life balance – utilizing business travel to discover new cities, explore local cultures, taste authentic cuisines and connect with new people across the country and around the globe.

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2013. All rights reserved.

Real Estate 101: Get Comfortable with Real Estate Terms

A Quick Reference Real Estate Glossary

Are you new to home buying or home selling (or getting back in the market after a really long time)? Get comfortable with real estate terms with our real estate glossary.

Below we’ve provided some simplified definitions for some commonly used (and commonly misunderstood) real estate terms.

Common Real Estate Terms & Their Definitions

Appraisal – The process of estimating or setting the market value of a piece of property, partially based on an analysis of comparable sales of similar homes in the area. An appraisal usually takes the form of a written report. Appraisals are usually required during the mortgage loan approval process.

Closing Costs – For buyers, closing costs consist of expenses that must be paid in addition to the purchase price of the home, like… For sellers, closing costs include expenses that will be deducted from the proceeds of the sale, like…

Commission – Compensation paid to real estate professionals for services rendered in connection with the sale or exchange of real property.

Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) – An in-depth analysis of nearby comparable home sales done by a real estate agent to estimate a home’s market value, usually performed to help select the most appropriate sale price.

Contingencies – Conditions written into a real estate contract that specify that the contract will cease to exist in the event of certain conditions. Contingencies, like requiring an acceptable property inspection report within a certain time period, must be met for a contract to be legally binding and carried out as written.

Contract – An oral or written agreement between competent parties who agree to perform or refrain from performing a certain thing. In real estate there are many different types of contracts, including listings, contracts of sale, options, mortgages, assignments, leases, deeds, escrow agreements, and loan commitments, among others.

Deed – A written, legal document that conveys or transfers property.

Escrow – The process in which an item of value, money or documents is deposited with and held by a trusted third party to be delivered upon the fulfilment of a condition. For example, the earnest money deposit is put into escrow the transaction is closed, at which time it is delivered to the seller.

Foreclosure – The process of taking possession of a mortgaged property as a result of a failure to keep up with timely mortgage payments. This can involve a forced sale of the property at public auction after which the proceeds of the sale are applied to the mortgage debt.

Home Inspection – A thorough inspection by a qualified professional who evaluates the structural and mechanical condition of a home. A home inspector may assess the condition of a property’s roof, foundation, heating and cooling systems, plumbing, electrical work, water and sewage and some fire and safety issues. In addition, the home inspector will look for evidence of issues that may affect the value of the property.

Homeowner’s Insurance – An insurance policy that combines personal liability insurance and hazard insurance coverage for a dwelling and its contents, often required by mortgage lenders.

Lien – A legal claim against the property as a result of a debt that must be paid off when the property is sold.

Mortgage – A legal document that specifies a temporary, conditional pledge of a property to the lender/creditor as security for the repayment of a debt, in this case a home loan.

Pre-approval – Pre-approval is a loosely used lending term that usually implies that a buyer has already talked to a lender. The lender has, in turn, checked the buyer’s credit history and income to determine that they will be able to get a loan up to a certain amount. The pre-approval helps a buyer find a home within their price range and submit a strong offer.

Short Sale – A short sale occurs when a property is sold at a moderate loss, as an alternative to foreclosure. The home is listed at a price lower than the amount owed on the mortgage. Buying a short sale home can require approvals from multiple lenders.

Title – A legal document evidencing a person’s right to or ownership of a property. A title report, often done by a title insurance company after an offer has been accepted, will show the history of the title as well as applicable encumbrances such as easements or liens.

 

As always, I am here to answer questions or help with your real estate transaction. Why not give me a call at 772-288-1765?

 

Authored by Eric Slifkin

Keller Williams Realty

772-288-1765

Relocating? Find a Trusty Mover with These Tips

By John Voket

I am spending a lot of time this April focusing on the many issues one has to consider when planning a move. But we haven’t really touched on the basics.

According to the Better Business Bureau (bbb.org) the April and May time period is when many leases expire and renters move. BBB recommends doing your homework before selecting a mover and there are many good reasons to do so.

Across the nation last year, 1.2 million consumers researched moving company Business Reviews to check companies’ marketplace reputations, however, BBB processed more than 8,400 complaints against movers.

Consumers should follow a few simple rules when selecting a mover to protect against potential scams this moving season.

State laws offer regulations that protect consumers and their property, and it is vital that consumers are aware of their legal rights and be aware of the red flags of moving scams.

BBB offers the following checklist for finding a trustworthy moving company:

  • Research the company thoroughly. While state regulations vary, all interstate movers must, at minimum, be licensed by the federal government and are assigned a motor carrier number you can verify.
  • Get at least three written in-home estimates. Not all price-quotes online or over the phone are legitimate. Keep in mind that the lowest estimate can sometimes be an unrealistic low-ball offer, which can cost you more in the end.
  • Know your rights. Research your rights as a consumer for interstate moves or for moves within Connecticut. Also, contact BBB and local law enforcement if the moving company fails to live up to its promises or threatens to hold your belongings hostage generic cialis from canada.
  • Consider getting full-value protection. It may cost a few dollars more up front, but it can provide some peace of mind and eliminate a headache after your move. Investing in full (replacement) value protection means any lost or damaged
  • Articles will be repaired or replaced, or a cash settlement will be made.

Before hiring movers to transport your belongings from one state to another, the Better Business Bureau, along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), suggest you know your rights and responsibilities. The FMCSA regulations protect consumers on interstate (state-to-state) moves – go to www.fmcsa.dot.gov for information.

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2013. All rights reserved.

Creating Curb Appeal: 6 Ways to Improve Your Home’s First Impression

Creating Curb Appeal: 6 Ways to Improve Your Home’s First Impression

Market InsiderYou’ve probably heard the old saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” That’s true in life, and it’s true in real estate. If you’re in the process of selling your home…  Read More

Authored by Eric Slifkin

Source: StuartHomeSearch.com

Listing Your Home: What to Expect While On the Market (part 3)

In all the confusion of choosing the right agent to list your home, determining an asking price and developing a marketing strategy, sellers almost always forget to ask (and their agents neglect to explain) what exactly is going to happen to them during the home sale process! “What to Expect While On the Market” is a series of posts I have created that are designed to give you an overview of the typical home-selling process, help you understand why we do things the way we do, and why we give the advice we give.

 

Part 1: Showings |  Part 2: Offers  |  Part3: Inspection

The first hurdle after contract acceptance is the inspection. The buyer will hire a professional inspector to thoroughly go over your home looking for major and minor defects (no home is perfect!). Areas of specific concern are: roof, air conditioner, hot water heater, pool equipment, structure, electrical and plumbing.

It’s not a bad idea to hire your own inspector prior to marketing the home. For $200 – $300, you can eliminate most surprises, and know up front if your roof or air conditioner will need to be replaced. If your air conditioner is unsafe or your roof is damaged, you will probably be asked to fix or replace it. You might as well know these things up front; possibly we can recapture the cost of repair or replacement in the listing price. When I act as a buyer agent, I insist that the roof and air conditioner be safe and functional for our clients.

Another advantage to pre-inspection is that many minor irritants can be fixed. The more “nickel and dime” problems that an inspector points out to a buyer, the more nervous the buyer becomes that the home hasn’t been maintained. When a home comes through inspection with a short punch list, the buyer feels good about the home, and is excited to move forward. Obviously, a lengthy punch list creates the opposite emotion.

What should I expect to fix?

A defective roof, air conditioner, sewer line, or septic system will almost always need to be repaired or replaced. Otherwise, there are no rules. The buyer can ask for anything, and you can respond any way you want.

Unless your home is truly in poor repair, the buyer should not give us a laundry list of minor repairs, but it happens every day. The inspection is simply a second negotiation.

 

What I Need From You

When you hire me to sell your home, you have certain expectations from me that I hope to fulfill and exceed. I also have expectations from my sellers that will make the process go smoothly and more profitably for all…

-A clean home, ready and available to show with reasonable notice
-Sellers out of the house during most showings
-No smoking in the home during the marketing period
-Lawn and pool care if your home is vacant
-A willingness to ensure a safe and working air conditioner, and an insurable roof to the new buyers, even if that means repairs or replacement (unless your home is marketed as a ‘fixer’)
-An open mind to our suggestions and recommendations

 

What You Can Expect From Me

Week One

-MLS entry
-Lockbox & sign installed
-Brochures delivered to home
-Web Sites activated
-Virtual Tour created and distributed
-First market report
-Feedback reports
-Review our first week on market (showing procedures, any feedback, general observations)

Weeks Two – Three

-Continued feedback reports
-Weekly check in phone calls
-Second market report (at three weeks)
-Brochures re stocked (as necessary)
-Discuss price adjustment
-Open house, if desired and appropriate

Weeks Four – Six

-Thorough review of the market and re evaluation of our strategy
-Continued feedback reports
-Weekly check in phone calls
-Evaluation of feedback
-Third market report (at six weeks)

Weeks Six – Onward

-Continued feedback reports
-Weekly check in phone calls
-Periodic market reports (if desired)
-Exterior photo re-taken (if necessary)

 

I Work for You

If you have additional needs, or suggestions for improving my service to you, please share them! I want your experience with me to be one of the best customer service experiences you’ve ever had. My goal is to provide 100% Customer Satisfaction. Help me make that happen.

 

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

 

Listing Your Home: What to Expect While On the Market (part 2)

In all the confusion of choosing the right agent to list your home, determining an asking price and developing a marketing strategy, sellers almost always forget to ask (and their agents neglect to explain) what exactly is going to happen to them during the home sale process! “What to Expect While On the Market” is a series of posts I have created that are designed to give you an overview of the typical home-selling process, help you understand why we do things the way we do, and why we give the advice we give.

 

Part 1: Showings |  Part 2: Offers  |  Part3: Inspection

Quick Offers
Even in a buyer’s market, we may receive an offer right away. Buyer agents with active buyers are on a daily watch for new listings. Well priced and well presented homes still can sell quickly and if your home meets the needs of an active buyer, his or her agent will show it to them as soon as possible. If this happens, it does not mean that your home was underpriced. Do NOT beat yourself up that you should have asked more. Overpriced homes that sit on the market get stale and the best way to obtain the highest price is to sell quickly.

Low Offers
Everyone wants a DEAL. Most buyers want to try a “low ball” offer to see what happens. Don’t be offended. If your home is reasonably priced, we’ll simply counter back. If you’re a little high, you’ll probably need to give a little. We’ll discuss your options thoroughly and you will make the final decision.

Contingent Offers
A contingent offer is one where the buyer needs to sell a home to qualify to buy yours. Responses to a contingent offer include the following:
1. Reject it, who needs the hassle?
2. Accept it, hopefully they’ll be able to sell their home.
3. Counter with a First Right of Refusal.
Home Sale Contingencies definitely add a wrinkle to the process. Instead of one inspection, one loan approval, one appraisal, we have to deal with TWO. Any real estate deal, contingent or not, can fall apart at any time prior to closing, but it is slightly more likely to happen with a contingency.

So why would you ever accept a contingency? A few reasons:

-More money- A good Buyer Agent knows that a contingent contract is not as appealing as a clean contract; therefore, the offer should be as attractive as possible in other respects. If you accept a contingent offer, you should expect a great price and reasonable terms.

– Market Realities- As real estate prices move higher, it will become more and more difficult for first time buyers to purchase a home. Therefore, the buyer for your home will likely already be a homeowner who needs to sell their home to qualify to buy a new home. Bridge loans are not easy or cost effective to get.

If you are committed to a specific moving date, it is probably a good idea to avoid contingent offers; however, in reality, I don’t know if a contingent contract (or any, for that matter) will close on time, or at all. Neither do I know if a clean offer will come along soon. Whether or not to accept a contingent offer is a judgment call. If we do agree to accept a contingent offer, I will work diligently to make the process as smooth as possible for you.

No Offers
I will be providing feedback to you from agents who show the home, so we may already know what the problem is (price, condition, location, etc.). Some homes simply take longer to sell than others, but in today’s market, many homes don’t sell at all. If we aren’t seeing second showings or receiving inquiries from showing agents within a reasonable amount of time, we need to discuss alternative strategies, including price.

 

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

 

 

Listing Your Home: What to Expect While On the Market

In all the confusion of choosing the right agent to list your home, determining an asking price and developing a marketing strategy, sellers almost always forget to ask (and their agents neglect to explain) what exactly is going to happen to them during the home sale process! “What to Expect While On the Market” is a series of posts I have created that are designed to give you an overview of the typical home-selling process, help you understand why we do things the way we do, and why we give the advice we give.

 

Part 1: Showings |  Part 2: Offers  |  Part3: Inspection

As soon as your home shows up for sale on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS), other real estate agents will expect to be able to show your home. The agent will call our office or showing service to schedule the showing and receive any special instructions. Showings are typically scheduled a few hours in advance within a certain time frame, for example between 2:00 and 4:00 on Tuesday. However, there are no strict guidelines on how much notice agents provide; sometimes they will call the day before; sometimes one hour before.

We will take the agent’s information, call you to confirm that the showing time will work for you, and then call back to the agent’s office with the approval and special instructions. This procedure ensures that only active real estate agents gain access to your home.

 

What to do during the showing window
Tidy up and LEAVE!! Many sellers understandably believe that because they know and love their home, they can best sell it to potential buyers. However, in reality, most buyers and their agents are uncomfortable looking at a home when the owner is there. They will tend to give only a cursory look to the home, and will have trouble imagining themselves in what is so obviously YOUR home.

When I am acting as Buyers Agents with my clients, I cringe when I realize that the owner is home and intends to show us the house himself.

 

How tidy does the home need to be?
As tidy and de personalized as reasonably possible. Potential buyers need to imagine themselves living in your home, which is difficult if it is messy, crowded or overly personal.

 

Strive for an odor free environment
Smell has enormous impact on buyers, even “pleasant” smells such as potpourri or baking bread may evoke negative feelings for some. Almost all buyers react negatively to pet smells, smoke and incense. Do not leave food cooking during showings – dinner is highly personal and will make buyers feel that they’re intruding on your privacy.

-While you’re on the market, try to prepare meals that don’t produce strong odors.
-Thoroughly clean your refrigerator. Out of habit, buyers will open the refrigerator door. Most refrigerators do not smell fresh and leave a lingering odor in the air.
-Clean out the litter box frequently. Cat odors can be a strong deterrent to sale. Ask a friend you can trust if your home has any pet odor at all.

 

A last look around as you leave each day…

-Make all beds
-Wash dishes
-Put away dirty (and clean) clothes
-Clean the sinks and mirrors
-Straighten newspapers
-Turn on lights
-Close toilet lids

Yes, it is inconvenient, but clean, tidy homes sell at higher prices, period. Isn’t it worth the extra effort?

 

Can I turn down a showing?
Of course – it’s your home and you have a right to privacy. HOWEVER, please understand how Buyer Agents work with their clients.

Typically, the agent and buyer schedule some time together to look at homes – perhaps 2 -3 hours once or twice a week. They may look at many homes in various parts of town. The agent may want to show your home between 1:00 and 2:00 on Saturday, along with other homes nearby.

If that time slot is inconvenient for you, and you turn down the showing, chances are that the buyer will never see your home. Unfortunately, it won’t work to ask the buyer to come at a different time, because they’ll already be in another part of town, or finished looking. Or, perhaps writing an offer on a competing home…

Try not to risk losing the Perfect Buyer by declining showings unnecessarily.

 

Agent Previews
Sometimes we will call you to schedule an “agent preview”. This means that an agent will come alone to your home (with no buyer) for a quick run through. There are three reasons agents preview:

1. They have busy buyers who want their agent to screen all properties before showing
2. They specialize in your area and like to keep up on the market
3. They have a new listing coming up and are checking out the competition.

The same guidelines for tidiness apply during previews, but it’s not really necessary to leave.

Previewing agents are usually just trying to get a feel for the home, so will probably just breeze through quickly. Don’t be offended or concerned if they are only in your home a few minutes.

 

Will I show or sell your home?
Maybe…but don’t be surprised if I don’t. There are thousands of real estate agents in our area so the chances of my selling your home personally are small. Of course, if I have, or find, buyer clients who might like your home, I’ll certainly show it to them first.

 

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

 

 

Listing Your Home for Sale in Stuart, FL

Listing Your Home for Sale

by Eric Slifkin, founder and team leader, the Stuart Home Search Real Estate Team

Eric Slifkin, Team Leader at StuartHomeSearch.com
Working with our Team- About Us

We are full time real estate agents in Stuart, Florida. Actually, we are much more than full time. We work early mornings, evenings, and weekends; whenever may be convenient for our clients. But being passionate about what we do, it quite often really doesn’t feel like work, so please do not hesitate to call us any time to discuss your situation.

A Win-Win Approach to Selling Your Home

Our philosophy about real estate is that we are here to help two parties (buyer and seller) find each other and complete a transaction with a minimum of stress. We are advocates for our clients. Our mission is to obtain the best possible price, terms and conditions for you- not to worry about the other parties’ preferences or feelings. That said, we find in most real estate transactions both home buyers and home sellers want to arrive at a win-win agreement, which is far more satisfying to both parties and ensures a pleasant closing experience for everyone.

As accomplished REALTORS® we are busy enough to fulfill our career goals, yet not so busy that we can’t take a personal interest in every client. Put simply, the sale of your home is as important to us as it is to you.

 

Our Areas of Expertise

Get a Professional Valuation  for Your Stuart Area Home now.Contrary to popular belief, real estate agents can’t be all things to all people. It is impossible for one person to be the expert in every neighborhood and every type of property in all price ranges. I believe that we are hired for our expertise and that we should serve our clients with that expertise, not the other way around. YOU, the real estate buying or selling public, do not have the responsibility or obligation to further our education or to be used as a guinea pig just so that we get a paycheck.

Therefore, I feel strongly that I and my team members should be up front with potential clients about our strengths and experience. While I feel that we are exceptional real estate agents, even in areas where we are not the “expert”, I think it’s only fair that YOU have all the information you need to make a hiring decision.

Our Service Area

We KNOW Treasure Coast neighborhoods. During my own career, I have sold homes throughout the area. Our focus is Martin County, which encompasses Stuart, Palm City, Hobe Sound, and Jensen Beach. I am especially familiar with the subdivisions of Palm City, which features some of the area’s most desirable neighborhoods. When you hire us, you hire local expertise. We won’t be driving from through several counties servicing our listings; We will be here for you.

Our Personal Professionalism

Just because you are selling your Stuart, Florida home yourself, doesn't mean your marketing has to suffer! Get your home marketed in front of millions of buyers.Representing our clients is our top priority. We are responsive to inquiries by both buyers and other agents, and will do our best to show our own buyer clients our listings first. Personally, I am respected in the real estate community as a “quality agent”, which means that other agents will be happy to show our listings to their buyers. They know that I am professional, fair and creative, which makes their job just a little easier.

 

I truly appreciate your business and look forward to helping make your next real estate transaction a pleasant and painless experience, and hopefully even a little fun!

 


Our Marketing Services

Before we go to market…

  • Market Survey- I preview competing listings to see how your home compares. I may call the agents of the sold listings I am using as comparables to see if there were any special circumstances surrounding their sale that I should know about, such as a divorce situation, structural problems, etc.
  • Professional Comprehensive Market Analysis- My market analysis is, in a word, thorough. I will show you the Current Competition and the Recent Sales and calculate the estimated proceeds you should receive at closing. I base my pricing recommendations both on closed sales and the current competition.
  • Pre-Marketing Improvement Suggestions & Assistance- I will go through your home with you to identify items that should be repaired or improved prior to market. I am a real expert in this area ~ I know what the market considers important (and what really doesn’t matter) and I can help you get the repairs done quite reasonably and painlessly. When you hire me to sell your home, you will have access to my preferred home improvement contractors.
  • Spruce-Up House Cleaning (if appropriate)- I can arrange to have your home thoroughly cleaned before going to market, and after you move out. Just let me know.
  • “What to Expect” Seller Booklet- I have created a helpful booklet describing the process of marketing your home with information such as … how to prepare for showings, what to expect when buyers look at your home, how to respond to offers, and much more.

On the Market

Your home is entered on our Regional MLS, which serves the entire Treasure Coast and Palm Beach County. Your home will be listed on the Regional MLS System (MLS) with appealing and accurate descriptions, interior pictures and a virtual tour.

  • For Sale Sign with Rider
  • Lock box
  • 7 day/week showing service
  • Open House(s)
  • Extensive Web Exposure- I invest heavily in online marketing of my listings. This marketing generates substantial traffic and e-mail inquiries, and are my third largest source of sales. All listings have a virtual tour, interior pictures and descriptive captions.
  • Virtual Tours- all of my listings have Virtual Tours that are posted to multiple real estate websites such as TCPalm.com, Zillow, Trulia, Realtor.com, Yahoo, Craigslist, Regional MLS and our own web sites. Virtual tours may consist of both still photos and panoramic “tours”, and will include pictures of every photogenic room in your home, the exterior, any view, the street scene, and the neighborhood attractions (parks, restaurants, shopping). I can post up to 50 photos on each tour!
  • 21st Century Technology- I am up to date on the latest real estate technology. I have a professional quality digital camera with a wide angle lens, so that the photos of your home will be sharp and attractive. I have a high quality laser printer that produces amazing graphics and pictures for your home brochures. I make extensive use of e-mail, and I update my web sites several times a week.

Market Survey & Market Updates

I stay on top of the market for you. I monitor the homes that have sold, and those that haven’t to ensure that we are still priced appropriately. I will provide updates to you periodically on the current market activity with:

  • New Competing Listings
  • Status of Competing Listings
  • Number of Showings
  • Number of Internet Hits
  • Feedback Reports I follow up with every buyer agent who shows your home. I will provide their feedback to you as soon as it comes in.
  • Creative Solutions/Objective Opinions As I get to know your home better, and the feedback starts coming in, I may find that the market is objecting to something that neither of us thought of. Or, I may discover special features in your home that should be showcased differently. Either way, I take great pride in my creative solutions – this is, making adjustments as we go along in response to market feedback and conditions.
  • If I see something that needs to be changed, I will tell you – whether or not I think it’s something that you want to hear. Many agents seem to assume that their clients are not open to suggestions, and I work on the assumption that that’s part of what you’re paying me for!

Contract to Closing Services

The real work begins after we’re “under contract”. There are inspections to negotiate, lenders to keep an eye on, and appraisers to be prepared for. Stringent monitoring of dates and deadlines is essential, as is a careful review of title work. We manage these processes utilizing a follow-up system that covers crucial items for every pending sale including:

  • Ordering the title commitment with distribution to all parties. If there are any problems found in the commitment, I will work with you and the buyer’s agent to resolve them.
  • Ensure that all disclosures are made properly, in a timely manner, and that all documents have signatures.
  • Review the closing figures carefully so that you get every penny that’s coming to you.
  • Place follow-up calls to the buyer’s lender and the buyer’s agent every week to ensure that the loan is progressing smoothly, and will notify you immediately if it appears the contract is in danger (in this case, I will aggressively renew full marketing).

Sometimes the most painful part of selling (and buying) a home is the inspection. If an issue arises in the inspection that needs attention, I will help negotiate the best settlement for you and assist in expediting agreed to repairs.

In our fluctuating market, appraisals can be problematic. It is not unusual to see a wide range of comparable sales for apparently similar homes, and an unprepared agent can cost her client money if she can’t justify the sales price of her listing. I am fully prepared for every appraisal, and may have already previewed any comparable sales the appraiser might use.

Selling your home will have its frustrating moments. How frustrating it is depends a lot on your real estate agent. I promise to do my best to reduce stress before, during and after the sale.


Online Marketing and Home Listing Syndication

We are a technology and social media real estate team, marketing through the Web and social media platforms. We don’t rely on door hangers, refrigerator magnets, calendars, postcards, or mailings; rather, your home is advertised on websites all across the web, making sure buyers see your home and everything it has to offer, 24/7. Here are some of the national sites where your home will appear:

Home Listing Syndication

To find out more about selling your home, click here

To get your home’s market value online for free, click here

 

Spurce: www.StuartHomeSearch.com