Is Your REALTOR® Sharpening an Axe?

By Lynn Pineda

“If I had five minutes to chop down a tree, I’d spend the first three sharpening my axe.”

-Abraham Lincoln

Preparedness in anything can greatly increase our effectiveness and chance for success. In real estate, the same holds true. When the time comes to hire a REALTOR® that’s prepared to assist you in selling or buying your home, what should you expect? How should your REALTOR® sharpen his or her axe to be of greatest value to customers?

As a REALTOR®, it goes beyond simply getting a real estate license. Preparedness involves the desire to be the best that they can be; a true spirit for real estate. It requires the genuine desire to service their customers. This advocacy for their customer will result in home sellers and homebuyers being so thrilled by their real estate experience that they will want to scream their REALTOR’s® name from the rooftop. So how do REALTORs® get such acclamation? What gives those with spirit the edge in real estate? It begins with the following:

Stay on top of the real estate market, trends and news.

This means not only being aware of overall real estate industry news and trends, but knowing the local real estate market and trends as well. Real estate is local. The real estate market can differ from one city to another. Where is the market headed? Your REALTOR® needs to know your local market. What type of market are you in: a seller’s, balanced or buyer’s market? If you’re selling a home or buying a home, knowing the type of market will make all the difference in how you set yourself up for success. How long does it take homes to sell? What are the absorption rates? At what price points are homes selling? What is the ideal price point for you to position the home you’re selling? What can you expect to pay for a home as a homebuyer?

Frequent reporting by industry experts who share their insights on the real estate market keeps any REALTOR® informed of where the market is trending, and it’s important to seek out this information.

Be well aware of the mortgage industry.

Knowing mortgage options and the effect interest rates will have on the home buying process enables a REALTOR® to guide a prospective homebuyer. It also enables a REALTOR® to advise home sellers what to expect from the demands of homebuyers.

Network with other real estate industry professionals.

Networking with those at the top enables a REALTOR® to learn from the best. What better way to learn a profession than from those who have gone before and succeeded before. It isn’t always necessary to reinvent the wheel. Networking with real estate professionals can also make the REALTOR® top of mind, when a referral is needed in the city they service. This can bring you a top notch REALTOR® when a networking REALTOR® gets referred to you. Had this network never been established, you may not have had the opportunity to have such a skilled REALTOR® representing you.

Be at the forefront of the Web, social media and its trends.

Your REALTOR® needs to know the power of the Web, as its power contributes to the effectiveness of the home-selling process. Selling a home is about getting your home seen by qualified buyers. Over 92 percent of homebuyers start their home search online, after all. Having these homes seen by the masses will first require that REALTORs® have a strong online presence. REALTORs® accomplish this by knowing the importance of developing their websites/blogs with the proper SEO (search engine optimization) techniques that will showcase a REALTOR’s® experience, customer reviews, character and skill – evidence that they sell many homes and sell them well.

Having a strong social media presence will also be key. You’ll want to find them providing quality real estate content and interacting on Twitter, Google+, Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, to name a few.

Be leery of any REALTOR® that isn’t on the first page of results when you Google their name. Today, buyers and sellers are online seeking real estate information and it’s up to any REALTOR® to make sure they’re providing online real estate value; smart, informational, up-to-the-minute, tech savvy information. Buyers and sellers will be drawn to REALTORs® who are clearly visible on the web. REALTORs® not found on the web should make you question their marketing ability. If they can’t market themselves, how will they ever market your home?

Hone in on skills necessary to be competent and efficient.

Expect your REALTOR® to be proficient in their ability to price a home, negotiate, problem solve and communicate toward the successful completion of a real estate transaction. Pricing a home is an art and demands a good understanding of the local market, and knowing how recent home sales, pending sales and active homes for sale compare to your home. Selling and buying a home requires in-depth negotiation skills from the moment a contract is presented, to contract acceptance, to inspections and right through to the day of closing. Problems will surface and having problem-solving abilities can smooth out any potential issues, keeping it from killing a sale. Last but not least, excellent communication skills are a requirement when dealing with so many different parties in a real estate transaction. You will have different personalities and emotions coming in from all angles and processing them will be key. Being good at reading people will direct the communication by simply reading their level of optimism or pessimism.

Continuing education

More education is required for both professional real estate licensing and for one’s own inquisitiveness and innate desire to stay in the know. Staying abreast of regulatory changes, housing regulations, real estate contract changes, along with any legislative updates are all critical, need to know facets of the business in order to ethically represent any seller or buyer.

In short, all of these real estate fundamentals will prove that preparedness and an ongoing eagerness to be the best at your craft will always benefit the customers being represented.

Lynn Pineda is a licensed Southeast Florida real estate agent.

View this original post on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall.

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2014. All rights reserved.

Selling Your Home? More Are Making a Fortune from China

By John Voket

It’s no secret that the U.S. imports billions of dollars in goods and products from China. But I want anyone interested in selling their home to know that China may provide the best prospective buyers for U.S. properties going on the market.

Chinese spent $8.2 billion on U.S. properties in 2012 according to the National Association of REALTORS©.

Juwai.com recently reported that from million-dollar trophy homes to more modest condominiums, Chinese are the fastest-growing segment of property buyers. Ju Wai, which means “home overseas” in Mandarin, is the largest Chinese international property portal.

The site states that property is THE investment of choice for Chinese consumers with low performing stock markets and minimal returns from property investment within China accelerating demand for international property.

Buyers from China are bolstering housing recovery in the U.S., with Silicon Valley leading the way – and most of them are all-cash buyers who swoop in and close deals within a week according to the site.

Juwai.com noted that agents, Anina Van Alstine and Sharon Witte, who co-listed a home located a stone’s throw away from Stanford University, received more than a third of the offers as “all-cash.” (The successful buyer closed the deal within 1 week.)

Juwai said individual Chinese investors are motivated by underpriced markets, educational opportunities for their children and diversifying their investments.

Julie Tsai Law, a Silicon Valley REALTOR©, says the main reason behind Palo Alto’s strong appeal for her buyers is the educational opportunities offered. And she said he clients from China prefer to “wire the money overnight and close within five days.”

For a modest Chinese investor’s perspective, CNBC recently reported on an individual who recently bought a property in Irvine, California. He plans to move his family to the U.S. when his daughter turns 10, but in the meantime he’s making a five percent return renting the property.

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2014. All rights reserved.

Buying and Selling a Home at the Same Time?

By John Voket

A home sale transaction can present one of the most stressful situations a person will encounter in their entire life. So what about those forced into situations where they are selling and buying at the same time?

Agent Teresa Hamilton of Lafayette, LA (teresahamilton.com/Blog) points out that if the timing of either transaction is thrown off by issues out of their control, sellers may find themselves either owning two homes at the same time or with no home at all and desperately searching for a short term rental.

Hamilton says closing on the sale of both homes simultaneously allows the seller to avoid a multiple move scenario. They also avoid having to secure a temporary residence and other hassles related to selling their old home before closing on a new one, and the expense of carrying two mortgages, two sets of utilities, and the care of a vacant house or management of a rental.

Anthony Lamacchia (mlrealtyne.com) out of Waltham, Mass., offers the following tips for homeowners in this situation:

-Negotiate a longer period until the closing date when you obtain a buyer for your home. Instead of the typical 45-day closing try to negotiate 60 or even 90 days so you have time to find the home you want.
-Disclose in your listing that closing the deal is “subject to seller finding suitable housing” to alert buyers that you have to find a home to move to.
-Or if you don’t disclose the above contingency publicly in your listing on MLS, you can still try to negotiate it into your offer and purchase and sales agreement.
-Sell your home to a buyer and request that they allow you to rent it back from them for a month or two until you find a home.
-Consider temporarily living with family or even try a short term rental.

Lamacchia believes this last alternative is actually the least stressful way to buy because the seller has the money in hand which makes it easier to buy. There is also less stress in doing one thing at a time.

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2013. All rights reserved.

A Strategic Approach to Real Estate Contracts and Deadlines

A Strategic Approach to Real Estate Contracts and Deadlines

By Keith Loria

Whether you’re buying or selling a home, adding deadlines to the real estate contract process is a tricky subject. After all, if someone makes an offer on your house, you may think they’ll go to any lengths to buy it. On the other hand, a buyer may think that just because they’re putting a bid on a house that’s been sitting on the market, their bid will be accepted regardless of what it is. That’s why many real estate agents discourage their clients from putting a deadline within the contract because when they aren’t met, it becomes a frustrating endeavor.

And what happens if you place a deadline on your offer and the seller doesn’t meet it? Are you automatically going to withdraw your bid? Probably not. Bluffs don’t play very well in the real estate game, so if you set a deadline and then no consequences come from not meeting it, you may find the rest of the negotiations going the other person’s way.

Additionally, when you place an offer that must be decided on by 9:00 p.m., this will be seen by the other party (buyer or seller) as a hard-sell. While it might seem like a good negotiating strategy on your end, it might be the exact opposite from the perspective of the other party. If you want to include deadlines like this in your offer, you must be willing to walk away if they aren’t met.

That doesn’t mean the deal can’t be worked out down the line, but if you’re not going to stand by your deadline, it’s probably better to leave them out of the equation altogether. Speediness is the essential strategy here on both sides of the transaction.

When in the midst of a seller’s market, it may make sense for a seller to set a deadline for reviewing all offers, as this will alert all interested buyers that they need to have their best offer in to compete with any other offers. This type of deadline is actually helpful because buyers can view other homes and put together a bid before the deadline, understanding that the seller isn’t going to make a decision prior to it being submitted.

For buyers, negotiation techniques typically recommend that you add a drop-dead date so that the seller can’t shop your offer or drag things out forever. This will protect you from losing out on other homes that might interest you.

If you’re making an offer in the evening, be sure to make the expiration early the next afternoon so no competing offers are likely to roll in. Have your agent express that there are other homes on your list that you’re just as happy with, that you’re ready to make an offer on. In this case, a deadline can be used to your advantage.

Contact our office today to learn more about the pros and cons associated with incorporating deadlines into real estate transactions.

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2013. All rights reserved.

Five Tips to Help Negotiate a Higher Selling Price for Your Home

Tips to Help Negotiate a Higher Selling Price for Your Home

By John Voket

These days, with shortages in pre-owned home inventories across many communities, it’s a seller’s market. With that in mind, a recent post from Wisconsin’s Dan Miller of madcitydreamhomes.com caught my eye.

Miller believes with the right negotiating strategy, there’s no reason why a home seller and his or her Realtor® can’t arrive at a final price that is markedly higher than the list price.

To that end, here is a sampling from Miller’s Tips for Negotiating the Highest Possible Selling Price:

— Be helpful and easy to work with. Buyers are generally open to negotiating with someone whom they perceive as helpful and likeable.

— Proactively and openly communicate with all buyer agents who have showings to date. Your agent’s job is to encourage as many people as possible to write an offer,

and should let each showing agent know about the tremendous amount of interest in your listing.

— Justify a selling price that is far above the list. It’s not recent sales in the area that will establish the final selling price – in this fast-rising market sold comps are often old news. Miller says it’s the momentum of the market that’s setting the price on your home. With high demand and low inventory, several different buyers are competing for your listing. These real-time market dynamics ultimately determine the final selling price of your home, not the sold comps.

— Provide all parties with a status update when your first offer comes in. You agent should call and email each showing agent, letting them know a window they have to submit their offer.

— Finally, Miller suggests that you negotiate and accept a secondary offer once your primary is accepted. This is a great tactic for your agent to employ in the event a primary offer falls through. It also gives you a position of strength as you negotiate around the home inspection with primary. With a solid Plan B, the first buyer may choose not to quibble with you over minor issues that arise during the inspection.

 

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

 

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2013. All rights reserved.

Real Estate 101: Get Comfortable with Real Estate Terms

A Quick Reference Real Estate Glossary

Are you new to home buying or home selling (or getting back in the market after a really long time)? Get comfortable with real estate terms with our real estate glossary.

Below we’ve provided some simplified definitions for some commonly used (and commonly misunderstood) real estate terms.

Common Real Estate Terms & Their Definitions

Appraisal – The process of estimating or setting the market value of a piece of property, partially based on an analysis of comparable sales of similar homes in the area. An appraisal usually takes the form of a written report. Appraisals are usually required during the mortgage loan approval process.

Closing Costs – For buyers, closing costs consist of expenses that must be paid in addition to the purchase price of the home, like… For sellers, closing costs include expenses that will be deducted from the proceeds of the sale, like…

Commission – Compensation paid to real estate professionals for services rendered in connection with the sale or exchange of real property.

Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) – An in-depth analysis of nearby comparable home sales done by a real estate agent to estimate a home’s market value, usually performed to help select the most appropriate sale price.

Contingencies – Conditions written into a real estate contract that specify that the contract will cease to exist in the event of certain conditions. Contingencies, like requiring an acceptable property inspection report within a certain time period, must be met for a contract to be legally binding and carried out as written.

Contract – An oral or written agreement between competent parties who agree to perform or refrain from performing a certain thing. In real estate there are many different types of contracts, including listings, contracts of sale, options, mortgages, assignments, leases, deeds, escrow agreements, and loan commitments, among others.

Deed – A written, legal document that conveys or transfers property.

Escrow – The process in which an item of value, money or documents is deposited with and held by a trusted third party to be delivered upon the fulfilment of a condition. For example, the earnest money deposit is put into escrow the transaction is closed, at which time it is delivered to the seller.

Foreclosure – The process of taking possession of a mortgaged property as a result of a failure to keep up with timely mortgage payments. This can involve a forced sale of the property at public auction after which the proceeds of the sale are applied to the mortgage debt.

Home Inspection – A thorough inspection by a qualified professional who evaluates the structural and mechanical condition of a home. A home inspector may assess the condition of a property’s roof, foundation, heating and cooling systems, plumbing, electrical work, water and sewage and some fire and safety issues. In addition, the home inspector will look for evidence of issues that may affect the value of the property.

Homeowner’s Insurance – An insurance policy that combines personal liability insurance and hazard insurance coverage for a dwelling and its contents, often required by mortgage lenders.

Lien – A legal claim against the property as a result of a debt that must be paid off when the property is sold.

Mortgage – A legal document that specifies a temporary, conditional pledge of a property to the lender/creditor as security for the repayment of a debt, in this case a home loan.

Pre-approval – Pre-approval is a loosely used lending term that usually implies that a buyer has already talked to a lender. The lender has, in turn, checked the buyer’s credit history and income to determine that they will be able to get a loan up to a certain amount. The pre-approval helps a buyer find a home within their price range and submit a strong offer.

Short Sale – A short sale occurs when a property is sold at a moderate loss, as an alternative to foreclosure. The home is listed at a price lower than the amount owed on the mortgage. Buying a short sale home can require approvals from multiple lenders.

Title – A legal document evidencing a person’s right to or ownership of a property. A title report, often done by a title insurance company after an offer has been accepted, will show the history of the title as well as applicable encumbrances such as easements or liens.

 

As always, I am here to answer questions or help with your real estate transaction. Why not give me a call at 772-288-1765?

 

Authored by Eric Slifkin

Keller Williams Realty

772-288-1765

Creating Curb Appeal: 6 Ways to Improve Your Home’s First Impression

Creating Curb Appeal: 6 Ways to Improve Your Home’s First Impression

Market InsiderYou’ve probably heard the old saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” That’s true in life, and it’s true in real estate. If you’re in the process of selling your home…  Read More

Authored by Eric Slifkin

Source: StuartHomeSearch.com

Just Sold: Golf Home In Monarch Country Club

 

Golf Home In Monarch Country Club

 
 
SOLD

 

 

Profile Image

Eric Slifkin

Keller Williams Realty

772-288-1765

Questions?
Find Out More!

Licensed In:
Florida

 

 

2159 SW Bradford Place

Palm City, FL 34990

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms : 3 (3 full)

List Price: $437,000

Living Area Approx :
2490

 

 

Susanne SabreSold by Susanne Sabre, Monarch Specialist

Susanne Sabre is the newest member of Eric Slifkin’s Real Estate Team at Keller Williams Realty of the Treasure Coast. Susanne lists and sells homes in Monarch and the surrounding areas of Palm City, Stuart, Jensen Beach, and Hobe Sound.

A long time resident of Palm City and member of Monarch Country Club, Susanne possesses an intimate knowledge of local golf and club communities, neighborhoods and subdivisions, which is very effective in marketing homes to buyers and for sellers.

Please call or email Susanne at 772-631-7264 to discuss your wants and needs.
 


This well maintained and updated home features three bedrooms and three full baths plus a den or possible fourth bedroom. The open plan affords beautiful views of the pool, expansive lanai, and golf course from most rooms. The interior boasts an open floor plan with vaulted ceilings and transom windows, new Entry Point front door, expanded dining and great rooms, newer 16″ tile in the living areas, gourmet kitchen with breakfast nook, and more. Other features include accordion storm shutters, newer A/C units, 3M impact window film, and golf cart. Furnishings available separately. Optional club membership is available. Monarch is minutes to “A” rated Martin County schools, shopping, dining, I95 and Florida’s turnpike.

 

 
 

 

 

L2L

Listing Your Home: What to Expect While On the Market (part 3)

In all the confusion of choosing the right agent to list your home, determining an asking price and developing a marketing strategy, sellers almost always forget to ask (and their agents neglect to explain) what exactly is going to happen to them during the home sale process! “What to Expect While On the Market” is a series of posts I have created that are designed to give you an overview of the typical home-selling process, help you understand why we do things the way we do, and why we give the advice we give.

 

Part 1: Showings |  Part 2: Offers  |  Part3: Inspection

The first hurdle after contract acceptance is the inspection. The buyer will hire a professional inspector to thoroughly go over your home looking for major and minor defects (no home is perfect!). Areas of specific concern are: roof, air conditioner, hot water heater, pool equipment, structure, electrical and plumbing.

It’s not a bad idea to hire your own inspector prior to marketing the home. For $200 – $300, you can eliminate most surprises, and know up front if your roof or air conditioner will need to be replaced. If your air conditioner is unsafe or your roof is damaged, you will probably be asked to fix or replace it. You might as well know these things up front; possibly we can recapture the cost of repair or replacement in the listing price. When I act as a buyer agent, I insist that the roof and air conditioner be safe and functional for our clients.

Another advantage to pre-inspection is that many minor irritants can be fixed. The more “nickel and dime” problems that an inspector points out to a buyer, the more nervous the buyer becomes that the home hasn’t been maintained. When a home comes through inspection with a short punch list, the buyer feels good about the home, and is excited to move forward. Obviously, a lengthy punch list creates the opposite emotion.

What should I expect to fix?

A defective roof, air conditioner, sewer line, or septic system will almost always need to be repaired or replaced. Otherwise, there are no rules. The buyer can ask for anything, and you can respond any way you want.

Unless your home is truly in poor repair, the buyer should not give us a laundry list of minor repairs, but it happens every day. The inspection is simply a second negotiation.

 

What I Need From You

When you hire me to sell your home, you have certain expectations from me that I hope to fulfill and exceed. I also have expectations from my sellers that will make the process go smoothly and more profitably for all…

-A clean home, ready and available to show with reasonable notice
-Sellers out of the house during most showings
-No smoking in the home during the marketing period
-Lawn and pool care if your home is vacant
-A willingness to ensure a safe and working air conditioner, and an insurable roof to the new buyers, even if that means repairs or replacement (unless your home is marketed as a ‘fixer’)
-An open mind to our suggestions and recommendations

 

What You Can Expect From Me

Week One

-MLS entry
-Lockbox & sign installed
-Brochures delivered to home
-Web Sites activated
-Virtual Tour created and distributed
-First market report
-Feedback reports
-Review our first week on market (showing procedures, any feedback, general observations)

Weeks Two – Three

-Continued feedback reports
-Weekly check in phone calls
-Second market report (at three weeks)
-Brochures re stocked (as necessary)
-Discuss price adjustment
-Open house, if desired and appropriate

Weeks Four – Six

-Thorough review of the market and re evaluation of our strategy
-Continued feedback reports
-Weekly check in phone calls
-Evaluation of feedback
-Third market report (at six weeks)

Weeks Six – Onward

-Continued feedback reports
-Weekly check in phone calls
-Periodic market reports (if desired)
-Exterior photo re-taken (if necessary)

 

I Work for You

If you have additional needs, or suggestions for improving my service to you, please share them! I want your experience with me to be one of the best customer service experiences you’ve ever had. My goal is to provide 100% Customer Satisfaction. Help me make that happen.

 

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.

 

Listing Your Home: What to Expect While On the Market (part 2)

In all the confusion of choosing the right agent to list your home, determining an asking price and developing a marketing strategy, sellers almost always forget to ask (and their agents neglect to explain) what exactly is going to happen to them during the home sale process! “What to Expect While On the Market” is a series of posts I have created that are designed to give you an overview of the typical home-selling process, help you understand why we do things the way we do, and why we give the advice we give.

 

Part 1: Showings |  Part 2: Offers  |  Part3: Inspection

Quick Offers
Even in a buyer’s market, we may receive an offer right away. Buyer agents with active buyers are on a daily watch for new listings. Well priced and well presented homes still can sell quickly and if your home meets the needs of an active buyer, his or her agent will show it to them as soon as possible. If this happens, it does not mean that your home was underpriced. Do NOT beat yourself up that you should have asked more. Overpriced homes that sit on the market get stale and the best way to obtain the highest price is to sell quickly.

Low Offers
Everyone wants a DEAL. Most buyers want to try a “low ball” offer to see what happens. Don’t be offended. If your home is reasonably priced, we’ll simply counter back. If you’re a little high, you’ll probably need to give a little. We’ll discuss your options thoroughly and you will make the final decision.

Contingent Offers
A contingent offer is one where the buyer needs to sell a home to qualify to buy yours. Responses to a contingent offer include the following:
1. Reject it, who needs the hassle?
2. Accept it, hopefully they’ll be able to sell their home.
3. Counter with a First Right of Refusal.
Home Sale Contingencies definitely add a wrinkle to the process. Instead of one inspection, one loan approval, one appraisal, we have to deal with TWO. Any real estate deal, contingent or not, can fall apart at any time prior to closing, but it is slightly more likely to happen with a contingency.

So why would you ever accept a contingency? A few reasons:

-More money- A good Buyer Agent knows that a contingent contract is not as appealing as a clean contract; therefore, the offer should be as attractive as possible in other respects. If you accept a contingent offer, you should expect a great price and reasonable terms.

– Market Realities- As real estate prices move higher, it will become more and more difficult for first time buyers to purchase a home. Therefore, the buyer for your home will likely already be a homeowner who needs to sell their home to qualify to buy a new home. Bridge loans are not easy or cost effective to get.

If you are committed to a specific moving date, it is probably a good idea to avoid contingent offers; however, in reality, I don’t know if a contingent contract (or any, for that matter) will close on time, or at all. Neither do I know if a clean offer will come along soon. Whether or not to accept a contingent offer is a judgment call. If we do agree to accept a contingent offer, I will work diligently to make the process as smooth as possible for you.

No Offers
I will be providing feedback to you from agents who show the home, so we may already know what the problem is (price, condition, location, etc.). Some homes simply take longer to sell than others, but in today’s market, many homes don’t sell at all. If we aren’t seeing second showings or receiving inquiries from showing agents within a reasonable amount of time, we need to discuss alternative strategies, including price.

 

This post has been authored by Eric Slifkin, REALTOR® serving South Florida’s Treasure Coast. You can reach me at 888-288-1765, or visit my Web site. As your resource for information on new or resale homes throughout the Treasure Coast, please be sure to contact me about any home you may find on the Web, yard sign or ad and I will research the property, arrange showings and handle all the details.